Internet Safety For Parents

Guidelines for parents

It is very important for parents to see and understand things that children are doing online. Parents need to set basic guidelines for the use of the device at home. 

NetSafe site – https://www.netsafe.org.nz/online-safety-for-parents/

Geeks on Wheels – https://www.geeksonwheels.co.nz/2015/11/05/keeping-your-children-safe-online/

Digital Squad – https://www.digitalsquad.co.nz/cyber-security-auckland/

Digi Parenting – https://digi-parenting.co.nz/

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Some suggestions:

1. Set clear guidelines with the child about how they use it.

For example, what will happen when the device is not used the way it should be? Will it be banned from being used at home for 3 days? A week? 

2. Ensure children use the device in public areas. 

So you can keep an eye on what they are accessing. No taking their device to the bedroom!

3. Set screen time limits.

Give them a set time to use their device. For example, they can only use the device from 4pm - 6pm, but only if necessary. After that, the device is being charged up in a public area overnight. Set time parameters that suits you and your family.

4. Check the history from time to time. 

If you're not sure how to do this, check this video for some help.

5. Contact your Internet Service Provider (ISP) for more help.

Depending on the quality of your router (or your provider), they might be able to help you set up your router so that it blocks specific websites. They also may tell you how to change the password for accessing the internet in your house, just in case you feel that your child is not using their device safely.

6. Help with harassment, bullying and abuse.

If you feel that your child is a victim of harassment, bullying or abuse, then try to take screenshots, screen clippings or photos of the evidence. You might feel it is necessary to contact NetSafe, or to complete an online contact form (through NetSafe), where they will contact you about how to handle the situation. Also contact the school, as they may be able to keep an eye on the children involved.

7. Work with the child, not against them.

If you are able to work out a system where your child feels as though they are trusted, and they know that they can talk to you if something does go wrong, then this is always the best option.